The global scenario in the sector of thermal comfort

THE ENERGY CHALLENGE

The global scenario in the sector of thermal comfort
The world’s energy consumption is increasing, and with it CO2
emissions: the planet’s environmental sustainability is at risk.
Every year, both domestic and commercial global consumption of primary energy increases proportionally to the social, economic and industrial development of emerging countries, and adds to the already significant consumption of Western countries.
Scenario per le emissioni di gas serra globali (Fonte: Our World in Data 2018)

An ultimatum to planet earth

Anthropic activities induced a global warming trend that pushed temperatures to rise by about 1°C in 2017, compared to pre-industrial levels.
Numerous regions have already suffered warming dynamics way above average. That is especially the case in continental areas: between 20 and 40% of global population lives in regions where global warming has been higher than 1.5°C for at least one season over the period 2006-2015.

Source: IEA 2018, World Energy Outlook
GLOBAL CO2 EMISSIONS

CO2 emissions are back on the rise.

After three years of global emissions remaining flat, 2017 marked a new rise in CO2 emissions.
Global energy-related CO2 rose by 1.4% in 2017, an increase of 460 million tons (Mt), and reached a historic high of 32.6 gigatons (Gt).
The increase in carbon emissions, equivalent to the emissions of 170 million additional cars, was the result of robust global economic growth of 3.7%, lower fossil-fuel prices and weaker energy efficiency efforts.

A GLOBAL CALL TO ACTION

Policy makers worldwide are looking at possible solutions to avoid this worst-case scenario. To address such a challenging tasks, however, a comprehensive analysis of all shifts in socio-economic factors is critical. There is a number of ways for the international community to act upon the threat posed by global warming. The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, approved in 2015, already sets a number of ambitious goals to attain a more sustainable way of living on a global scale. It is yet unclear whether the goals set for 2030 will be reached successfully. In its “World Economic Outlook 2018”, the IEA analyses several future scenarios according to different possible policies. In particular, the IEA identifies several measures at no economic cost which, if put in place, could curb emissions and allow us to reach the 2°C global warming target set by the 2015 Paris Agreement.
AREAS OF INTERVENTION TO CURB CO2
  • END-USE EFFICIENCY 44
  • OTHER 56

Energy efficiency represents the main intervention to curb CO2.

According to the 2017 report of the International Energy Agency, if we consider the total number of possible areas of intervention for curbing CO2 emissions by 2040, 44% derives from the energy efficiency mainly of products used by end users. More efficient products can contribute to substantially reducing the forecast increase in annual emissions.
ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN EUROPE BY SECTOR
  • THERMAL COMFORT 28
  • OTHER 21
  • INDUSTRY 23
  • TRANSPORTATION 28

In Europe, thermic comfort accounts for 28% of total energy consumption.

Analysing Europe alone, energy consumption and the related emissions are caused by three main areas: 23% is attributable to the industrial
sector, 28% to transportation and 28% to domestic and commercial thermal comfort.
AVERAGE RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION:
Western Europe

80% of residential energy consumption is for thermic comfort.

Thermic comfort is particularly important in residential energy consumption. An average, final energy consumption for domestic heating represents approximately 67% of total consumption, and increases up to 80% if energy consumption for water heating is considered.
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